In one of my schools this week I’ve been helping out with kindergarten screening.  I’ve been administering a phonological awareness assessment that is short and the kids mostly think we’re playing some word games. One of the subtests asks me to say two syllable words in parts and have the child put the word together.  The directions read:

I’m going to say a word in a funny way, listen, pen… cil.  Now can you put the parts together and say the word?

Well, all this little boy, whose face is the shape of a ripe cantaloupe, heard was say a word in a funny way… He looked up at me and said, “I can say it in a funny way too!” And then said ‘pen…cil’ as if he’s just sipped on some helium.

He then proceeded to repeat every other word I split into parts in an alternating ‘funny way’ – robot voice, mouse voice, gruff voice, etc.  After a few words, I started laughing.  The kid is funny and I’m never one to deny a quality joke.  My laughter made him laugh – even through his giggles, he continued to say the words in new ‘funny ways’ – the mark of a true comedian.